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Avalanche Journal: Assessing potential options for Colorado’s No. 24 pick, an “unreal asset”

Avalanche Journal: Assessing potential options for Colorado’s No. 24 pick, an “unreal asset”

22/06/2024, USA, Multi Sports, USA Publications, Article # 31829439

Chris MacFarland could use another couple of days at the NHL draft like he experienced a year ago.

The Colorado Avalanche general manager won’t have some of the same tools available to him to help reshape his current roster, but MacFarland and his club could certainly use an impact prospect, some present help for the NHL team, or both.

Colorado has the No. 24 selection at the 2024 NHL draft, which next weekend in Las Vegas. The Avs currently don’t have another pick until the fourth round, at No. 121.

“The first-round pick is an unreal asset,” MacFarland said at the NHL draft combine earlier this month in Buffalo, N.Y. “We believe we’re going to have the opportunity to get a really good hockey player at that spot. Will the phone ring? During draft week, it usually does. Right now, we’re doing the grunt work on the guys and the final touches on our list.”

A year ago, the Avs traded a young player (Alex Newhook) for the No. 31 and 37 picks and used some extra cap space to add Ryan Johansen in a salary dump move by Nashville. They also used pick Nos. 27 and 31 on their top two prospects, Calum Ritchie and Mikhail Gulyayev, and traded No. 37 to Tampa Bay for Ross Colton.

MacFarland doesn’t have a player quite like Newhook to dangle, though Daily Faceoff reported that Colton could be available if the Avs seek some cap relief to try and sign other players. He doesn’t have the cap space to take advantage of another team’s squeeze.

But there could be a future impact player available at No. 24. The Avs could try to move back and add another pick, or move No. 24 for an NHL player, presumably a cost-controlled one who helps the cap puzzle fit together.

Who are some of the players that could be available at No. 24? The Avs’ pipeline is thin, so positional need should not be an issue.

We compiled a composite ranking from seven draft expert sources — The Athletic, ESPN, TSN, Sportsnet, FLO Hockey, Daily Faceoff and Elite Prospects — for players who might be drafted at or near the 24th selection.

Michael Hage, center

Height, weight: 6-foot-1, 188 pounds

Composite: 19.5

Hage had a dominant season for the Chicago Steel in the USHL, the same program that helped develop Macklin Celebrini and Adam Fantilli and is headed to Michigan next season. He should go in the teens, but two lists had him in the mid-20s.

Igor Chernyshov, wing

Height, weight: 6-3, 204

Composite: 20.1

Has the potential to be an impact power forward while also earning praise for his work rate without the puck. Sounds like a couple of guys the Avs are pretty familiar with. He should go higher on talent alone, but could slide given teams won’t be certain when he’ll play for them.

Adam Jiricek, defense

Measurables: 6-2, 185

Composite: 20.1

His brother went sixth two years ago, but he’s not quite the same level. He should go in the teens but missed a big chunk of this season with an injury. Injuries can lead to someone lasting longer than expected on draft night.

Jett Luchanko, center

Height, weight: 5-11, 187

Composite: 24.3

Earned plaudits for his skating ability, competitiveness, work ethic and hockey IQ. Made a huge leap forward this year as a prospect.

Sacha Boisvert, center

Height, weight: 6-2, 183

Composite: 24.5

Great production in the USHL, but he also needs some time in the weight room. He’s going to North Dakota and could spend two or three years there.

Terik Parascak, wing

Height, weight: 6-0, 179

Composite: 28.5

Huge breakout season after barely playing in the WHL last year. High-end offensive ability, but his ability to skate at an NHL level is a question mark.

Nikita Artamonov, wing

Height, weight: 5-11, 187

Composite: 28.6

Played with Avs forward Nikolai Kovalenko this season in the KHL. Isn’t particularly big, but plays hard and contributed to a playoff team at 18, which isn’t a common occurrence in that league.

EJ Emery, defense

Height, weight: 6-3, 183

Composite: 29.5

Was a star at the combine testing, but there are questions about whether he’ll offer enough help offensively at the NHL level.

Emil Hemming, wing

Height, weight: 6-1, 205

Composite: 33.9

Lots of praise for his shooting ability and offensive instincts, but less for his skating ability. Feels like a player who could pop with the right development, or end up as a tweener.

Yegor Surin, center

Height, weight: 6-1, 197

Composite: 35.5

His ranking looks lower because of one list putting him in the 60s, but Surin had a big year in Russia’s junior league. The scouting report sounds a bit like Kovalenko — offensive ability with a desire to create chaos — though with more upside.

Trevor Connelly, wing

Height, weight: 6-1, 160

Composite: 19.4

Connelly is the wild card of the first round. On talent alone, he should be gone well before the Avs pick. His off-ice history is loaded with red flags. Some teams won’t even consider him. The team that selects will face scrutiny.

Want more Avalanche news? Sign up for the Avalanche Insider to get all our NHL analysis.



https://www.denverpost.com/2024/06/22/avalanche-journal-2024-draft-options/
Avalanche enters uncertain offseason with contender status in jeopardy: “They are a team in flux r

Avalanche enters uncertain offseason with contender status in jeopardy: “They are a team in flux r

22/06/2024, USA, Multi Sports, USA Publications, Article # 31829440

No NHL team has won more regular-season games over the past four seasons than the Colorado Avalanche.

The only clubs with more playoff victories in that span are Tampa Bay, the 2021 champion and ’22 runner-up, and Florida, which became the 2024 champ Friday night/can win the title Monday night.

And yet, there is unease about the future of the Avalanche as the 2024 offseason kicks into high gear this week.

The 2022 Cup champs have very little cap space to work with this summer — a common issue for most franchises that have spent half a decade building a title contender.

What separates the Avs are a pair of wrinkles in both the short- and long-term that no other championship contender can match. As Nathan MacKinnon put it this week during an interview on TSN 1050 radio in Toronto, “It feels like 10 years ago (when) we actually did win now.”

Nathan MacKinnon (29) hoists the cup as he parties alongside Erik Johnson (6) and Gabriel Landeskog (92) during the Colorado Avalanche Stanley Cup celebration parade in downtown Denver on Thursday, June 30, 2022. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post)
Nathan MacKinnon (29) hoists the cup as he parties alongside Erik Johnson (6) and Gabriel Landeskog (92) during the Colorado Avalanche Stanley Cup celebration parade in downtown Denver on Thursday, June 30, 2022. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post)

“They’ve got multiple great players. They are always going to be a great team with MacKinnon, (Cale) Makar and (Mikko) Rantanen, but they are a team in flux right now,” Bruce Boudreau, former NHL coach and analyst for TSN and NHL Network, said. “They’re never going to be a bad team with those guys. It’s just a matter of whether they can get into the Stanley Cup conversation again.”

On one hand, the Avs just built one of a few no-doubt Cup contenders for the 2023-24 season. The window certainly remains open to keep doing that.

On the other, the margins are incredibly thin, and the challenges the Avs face this summer are unique. Gabe Landeskog’s attempt to return after two lost seasons, plus Valeri Nichushkin’s suspension until at least mid-November, could limit what the Avs can do the tweak the roster.

It could be difficult to just get back to where this season ended, let alone win 10 more playoff games in 2025.

“The salary cap is a significant challenge for us, and we’ve got things we’re going to have to navigate,” Avs general manager Chris MacFarland said. “Does that impact things that potentially you want to try and do? … (It) very well may. But that’s our job is to try and find work-around solutions or workable solutions.”

Colorado has a little more than $16 million in cap space available, per CapFriendly, but $6.125 million of that is Nichushkin’s contract not counting toward the $88 million ceiling while he’s suspended. That allows the Avs some flexibility, particularly when it comes to filling out the last few roster spots, but eventually either Nichushkin’s contract goes back on the books or the club will need a significant trade or injury to be cap compliant.

So the working number for this summer is really more like $10 million, but that’s before new No. 2 center and pending restricted free agent Casey Mittelstadt signs a contract. The Avs would also like to bring back unrestricted free agent Jonathan Drouin, but both of those players’ new deals could be $10 million or more combined.

The Avs need to get Mittelstadt signed to find short-term clarity. They can also sign Rantanen to a long-term extension starting July 1, and that would provide a necessary data point for long-term planning as well.

The rest of the roster fine-tuning could involve creativity or a return to the bargain bin, where the Avs have collected some intriguing players in recent summers.

“It’s kind of like the Leafs with the salary cap, where you’ve got to find the right combination of other players,” Boudreau said. “I didn’t think they had great depth on the third and fourth lines. They need to find a way to get back to that.

“I love these two players, but I’m not sure you can win with (Zach) Parise and (Andrew) Cogliano as regulars in the playoffs. Look at what happened with a guy like (Joe) Pavelski too. If they can find younger guys to play like them, that would help.”

If the Avs could wish it into existence, Landeskog coming back and returning to something close to his level of play before his four procedures is the easiest solution to Colorado’s problems.

Colorado Avalanche left wing Gabriel Landeskog, right, during practice before game five of the First Round of the 2024 Stanley Cup Playoffs against the Winnipeg Jets at the Canada Life Centre in Winnipeg, Canada on Tuesday, April 30, 2024. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)
Colorado Avalanche left wing Gabriel Landeskog, right, during practice before game five of the First Round of the 2024 Stanley Cup Playoffs against the Winnipeg Jets at the Canada Life Centre in Winnipeg, Canada on Tuesday, April 30, 2024. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

Devon Toews called Nichushkin a “one-of-one” player when he went into the NHL-NHLPA Players Assistance Program in January. The one player whose on-ice game most resembles Nichushkin’s is probably a healthy Landeskog.

Having both of those guys playing well in the 2022 playoffs was a huge part of the Cup run. Just having one of them this past year made the Avs one of the best teams in the league.

“If both of those guys were healthy, you’d sit there and say, ‘OK, we’ve got a juggernaut again on our hands,’” Boudreau said. “You just don’t know with those two guys.”

The Avs could find internal improvements in some places to help offset what could be a thinner and relatively unproven roster, at least at the start of the 2024-25 season. A full season with Justus Annunen as Alexandar Georgiev’s goaltending partner could help prevent more goals.

A full year of Mittelstadt should be an upgrade on the second line. Sam Malinski and the right low-cost partner next to him could cancel out the potential loss of Sean Walker.

Once the Avs have a better handle on what Landeskog and Nichushkin will contribute, there could still be time to alter the roster ahead of the trade deadline and improve the club’s Cup chances.

“Between the coaches and management, they have a really good feel for what they need,” said Minnesota Wild coach John Hynes. “Just look at what they did this year and some of the additions they made at the deadline. I think they targeted what they needed, and they got it. They didn’t ultimately win, but I think they made the right adjustments to their team.”

That is ultimately one of the biggest reasons for hope in Denver. The most obvious one is the top of the lineup. An inner-circle core of MacKinnon, Makar, Rantanen and Toews is arguably the league’s best. If Landeskog can be close to what he was before, the Avs add another core player and one of the great “heart-and-soul” figures in the NHL.

Colorado Avalanche right wing Valeri Nichushkin (13) celebrates his first ever hat trick after scoring an empty net goal late in the 3rd period against Winnipeg Jets center Mark Scheifele (55), left, and center Mason Appleton (22) to win game four 5-1 of the first round of the NHL playoffs at Ball Arena in Denver on Sunday, April 28, 2024. Colorado Avalanche right wing Mikko Rantanen (96) gets up on ice behind Nichushkin. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)
Colorado Avalanche right wing Valeri Nichushkin (13) celebrates his first ever hat trick after scoring an empty net goal late in the 3rd period against Winnipeg Jets center Mark Scheifele (55), left, and center Mason Appleton (22) to win game four 5-1 of the first round of the NHL playoffs at Ball Arena in Denver on Sunday, April 28, 2024. Colorado Avalanche right wing Mikko Rantanen (96) gets up on ice behind Nichushkin. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

If Nichushkin can get right in his personal life and mend fences within the organization, he has a path forward to returning as part of the core as well. If not, there could be more salary cap flexibility to either improve the bottom of the roster or find an impact player to replace him.

Colorado’s hockey team still has a top half of the roster few NHL teams can match. There’s also reason for skepticism about the club’s short-term ability to remain on the short list of no-doubt Cup contenders.

“I think they’re going to continue to be a strong team,” Hynes said. “When you have the core guys they have and they’re in their prime … they’re extremely competitive and they’ve won. It’s in their DNA. I think it’s shown over the past few years that they are an extremely talented, competitive team in both the regular season and playoffs. It’s hard to win (the Cup), but they did it.

“They are still starting ahead of like 90 percent of the teams.”

They might face first-world problems, but the Avs have an uncertain summer after a frustrating end to what was a “Cup or bust” season. It busted, and the challenge now is to make sure those expectations remain reasonable in the years to come.

Want more Avalanche news? Sign up for the Avalanche Insider to get all our NHL analysis.



https://www.denverpost.com/2024/06/22/avalanche-uncertain-offseason-cup-contender/
Grading The Week: Parker’s Derrick White deserves Team USA spot at Summer Olympics

Grading The Week: Parker’s Derrick White deserves Team USA spot at Summer Olympics

22/06/2024, USA, Multi Sports, USA Publications, Article # 31829441

You can call the kids on the Grading The Week team a lot of things (and you have), but don’t call us homers.

Unless Derrick White is involved.

With Boston’s big Buffalo? Guilty. Guilty as charged. When our favorite former CU Buff/former UCCS Mountain Lion/former Legend High Titan is on the docket, our level-headed, crack staff is about as objective as Hawk Harrelson calling White Sox games.

So, yeah, if the Nuggets couldn’t put a ring on it during the NBA Playoffs, GTW is happy to see White, a native of Parker, finally reach the mountaintop as a key cog of the Boston Celtics’ 18th title team.

At 29, White keeps writing a script worthy of a biopic — from barely recruited out of high school, to a late growth spurt, to a meteoric rise from CU to drinking champagne as a guard with the most storied franchise in pro hoops. The Legend alum keeps stacking legendary moments.

Dude’s living a dream. So why not add the Dream Team to the narrative, while we’re up?

Derrick White + Paris 2024 — A.

According to ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski, White is “in the mix” to replace Kawhi Leonard on Team USA this summer if the latter isn’t healthy enough for the Summer Games.

If the basketball fates are kind, Team GTW thinks our guy, objectively, would be a perfect fit.

Why? While White might not offer the volume firepower of Kawhi, a roster with LeBron, Anthony Edwards and Steph Curry already has too few shots for too many stars. Team USA could use a “glue guy,” unselfish to the core, someone who’ll sacrifice his stats for a “W” on the scoreboard. Check and check.

Plus, we already know White’s a good fit with Team USA guard Jrue Holiday, his Boston teammate. And he’d give the U.S. staff another potential stopper, as Holiday is currently the only backcourt representative on the Olympic men’s hoops squad from the NBA’s All-Defensive first or second teams. If you’re not going to send Alex Caruso to Paris, you might as well send Parker’s finest.

Nathan MacKinnon’s candor — A-minus

The only thing Nathan MacKinnon cuts through better than NHL defenses is layers of crapola.

To wit: During a radio appearance on TSN 1050 on Tuesday, the Avalanche star said out loud what a lot of Avs fans have been thinking for weeks.

“It feels like 10 years ago we actually did win (the Stanley Cup),” MacKinnon said. “I just think when you feel like you have teams (that can) win and you don’t, it just feels like a waste of a season.

“It feels like that again this year for us. I felt like we were good enough to win, and we didn’t. It just leaves a really bitter taste in your mouth.”

No kidding. The Avs, as defending champs, were upset in the first round of the ’23 playoffs by Seattle in seven games. This past spring, Colorado made quick work of Winnipeg, eliminating the Jets in five games, but was knocked out in the second round by a familiar nemesis in the Dallas Stars and a familiar playoff gremlin in coach Pete DeBoer.

Mack The Knife totaled a low-for-him five points over a six-game series loss to Dallas and on “The Jeff Marek Show” this week, he put some of the blame for the setback on himself.

“I didn’t produce the way I needed to in that series. Just wasn’t good enough,” he said. “Just couldn’t get the puck in the net, that was a tough team, good goalie, but yeah, got to be better.”

Notching 140 points over the regular season and likely a Hart Trophy sure doesn’t sound like a waste to the GTW crew, but that’s Nate being Nate. And why the Avs’ championship window is open for as long as No. 29’s still flying down the ice.

Want more Nuggets news? Sign up for the Nuggets Insider to get all our NBA analysis.



https://www.denverpost.com/2024/06/22/derrick-white-cu-buffs-celtics-star-deserves-olympic-dream-team-slot/
Former UCF pitcher Sarah Willis enjoys time in Athletes United pro league

Former UCF pitcher Sarah Willis enjoys time in Athletes United pro league

22/06/2024, USA, Multi Sports, USA Publications, Article # 31829280

The last time most UCF fans saw pitcher Sarah Willis, she was coming off a 12-inning, complete-game performance in the Knights’ 2-1 loss to Auburn in the Tallahassee Regional of the NCAA Softball Tournament in May.

It was a Herculean effort for Willis, who threw 200 pitches while trying to keep the Tigers in check in a rain-delayed game at Florida State’s JoAnne Graf Field that lasted 4 hours and 28 minutes, finishing at 3 a.m.

“It definitely was an experience,” Willis told the Sentinel. “That’s the longest I’ve ever thrown in a game … so getting to compete that long was super cool. But I haven’t honestly talked about it with many people.”

While the loss ended UCF’s season and her collegiate career, Willis wouldn’t need to wait long before another chance presented itself. A week after the Super Regionals, the California native was contacted by several professional softball leagues eager for her services.

She reached a deal to play with Athletes Unlimited Pro Softball League.

Former UCF softball pitcher Sarah Willis has been playing for Athletes Unlimited Pro Softball for the 2024 AUX season in Wichita, Kansas, from June 10-25, 2024. (Photo by Jade Hewitt/Athletes Unlimited)
Former UCF softball pitcher Sarah Willis has been playing for Athletes Unlimited Pro Softball in Wichita, Kan. (Courtesy of Athletes Unlimited)

“I was waiting to see if they would give me a call and they did,” said Willis. “I was super ecstatic about it and I took their offer.”

Willis signed with the player-centric professional league based in Wichita, Kan.

“I like getting the opportunity not only to play with one group of people, but you’re playing with a different team weekly,” Willis said. “You get to meet so many new people but compete against such a broad spectrum of people.”

The league drafts several teams from a pool of about 42 players each week. Those teams play a series of games against each other.

The pool has rookies out of college and veterans who have been around the game for a while.

“Some of the veterans are some of the people I used to watch, such as Keilani Ricketts and Taylor Edwards; all of these people that I’ve looked up to since I was younger and watched them play to the rookies that I have been playing against either in travel ball or at the college level,” said Willis.

Contract details released for UCF coordinators Ted Roof, Tim Harris Jr.

“Playing AU has been awesome because I’ve gotten an opportunity to still play the sport that I love after college and be able to be a professional athlete. To compete against the best and learn from the best, it’s been an amazing experience.”

While this season of AU softball wraps up this week, Willis hopes to continue with the league. If not, she might find her way back to Orlando.

“I have an opportunity to be a graduate assistant at UCF,” said Willis, who spent two seasons with the Knights after transferring from Washington in 2022. “That’ll be my next year or two with UCF softball back at it again. So, at least four years with Coach Bear [Cindy Ball-Malone] or even more.

“I know she just added some new people to the staff, so I’m excited to see what the new staff looks like and what the new team looks like without all the seniors.”

Willis hopes to complete a master’s degree in interdisciplinary studies with student-athlete academic advising and communications.

UCF’s Johnny Dawkins believes Knights proved they belong in Big 12

 

UCF is entering its second Big 12 season.

“It’s super cool that I’m going to be able to watch the team grow,” said Willis. “A few teams are leaving [Texas, Oklahoma] and a few teams joining [Arizona, Arizona State, Colorado and Utah]. So it’s like forming a new conference together and trying to get back to the top.”

UCF finished with 31-25, including 12-15 in the conference last season. And while an appearance in the NCAA Tournament was special, Willis believes more could have been done.

“We met everybody’s expectations, but I still felt like we could have done more in the Big 12,” she said. “Our competition was at an all-time high, and we were facing the best of the best each weekend, and we did a good job. But I have high standards, and I wanted to be first in the conference.”

Matt Murschel can be reached at mmurschel@orlandosentinel.com



https://www.orlandosentinel.com/2024/06/22/ucf-knights-big-12-softball-sarah-willis-athletes-united/
Calmer feet of Bucs’ Baker Mayfield reflect a quiet confidence

Calmer feet of Bucs’ Baker Mayfield reflect a quiet confidence

22/06/2024, USA, Multi Sports, USA Publications, Article # 31829308

TAMPA BAY ― Baker Mayfield always has battled his emotions and the expectations that come with being a Heisman Trophy winner and No. 1 overall pick in the NFL draft.

He plays with a fire that is both inspiring and unnerving, especially when he flees the pocket in an attempt to extend a play or make something happen running the football.

But the Tampa Bay Buccaneers would like to see Mayfield do more with his arm and less with his feet, something the 29-year-old quarterback has been working hard at this offseason.

“You try to improve everything, but for me right now [it’s] slowing my feet down a little bit,” Mayfield said. “I’ve always kind of had constantly moving feet like some of the QBs do. But just slowing it down to where I’m not passing up progressions and staying smooth through that process. Just going through it and being decisive with the ball.”

Mayfield has to adjust to a new offense under new coordinator Liam Coen, new responsibilities to take multiple plays to the line of scrimmage and new targets such as rookie receiver Jalen McMillan.

Despite the changes, he’s more comfortable than he was this time a year ago, when he was battling Kyle Trask for the starting job and joining his fourth team in about 18 months.

Mayfield signed a three-year, $100 million contract in March, settled down by buying a new home with his wife, Emily, on Davis Islands and is a first-time father to Kova Jade, who recently turned 8 weeks old.

On the field, things also are shaping up nicely for Mayfield in his second season with the Bucs.

“It’s a lot of continuing the chemistry we had with the skill guys last year, carrying that over,” he said. “And then just offensively, scheme-wise, getting everybody on the same page. It’s really awesome that we have everybody here on offense, just going through that. … Just trying to get to know the younger guys. But we’ve got a lot of guys that have promise, so that’s what you want to see.”

Ironically, it’s in improving the NFL’s worst run game of the past two seasons where Mayfield may have the most impact.

“There’s a lot more responsibility at the line of scrimmage,” he said. “A lot more double play calls to where you’re having to get your guys in the right position. But as a quarterback, you want that responsibility or accountability. You always want to put your guys in the best position to have success. Now Liam is giving us the opportunity with a couple play calls to be able to do that.”

Mayfield also addressed some of the changes he is coping with this offseason, from the “holdout” of tackle Tristan Wirfs to getting used to new rookie weapons and balancing expectations with unfinished business.

As for Wirfs, Mayfield’s bestie on the club who is not participating in voluntary organized team activities, Mayfield couldn’t draw many parallels to his contract situation.

“Our situations are different, because he is kind of under a fifth-year option,” Mayfield said of Wirfs’ deal, which would pay him $18.244 million this season. “There’s a difference there, whereas it was free agency with mine.

“But when it comes down to Tristan, everybody knows he’s a team guy. At a certain point, does he deserve to be paid? Absolutely. The guy’s a stud. He took to the transition from right to left [tackle] with ease. Better than I think he thought he was going to.

“But you just trust in that process, and I know he’s probably more eager to get back here and get the deal done than anybody else. We’re not holding out on the friendship, even though he’s holding out on us.”

While attendance for the voluntary offseason workouts has been strong — fewer than a handful of players were absent — Mayfield has used them to try to build chemistry with new weapons, such as McMillan and rookie running back Bucky Irving.

“Jalen has got such a natural feel as a receiver,” Mayfield said. “He’s extremely smooth, one of those guys that doesn’t look like he’s really covering a lot of ground because it looks effortless, but he really is. He’s a guy who can run every route you have in your route tree. … He always attacks the ball when it’s in the air, which is great to see for a young guy.

“Bucky, it’s a little hard in the run game with no pads on, but one thing I’ll say — and obviously he’s got good hands — but when he decides to cut it upfield north and south, he goes.”

For Mayfield, his second season with the Bucs will give him a chance to become a more vocal leader both inside and outside the huddle.

“Last year was trying to learn the system on the fly, getting to know teammates as well,” he said. “Balancing that with performance versus getting to know everybody and trying to be a leader. … I’m vocal, but most of the time I’m only vocal when I need to be.

“You never want to feel comfortable. Is it great knowing I’m going to be here for a couple years? Of course. It means I get to settle in here, be myself even more so and push these guys to the next level, and that’s a good feeling.”

The chaos of the past three seasons now behind him, there is only calm for Mayfield.

“When I say calm my feet, sometimes I process information pretty quickly and my feet get out of whack a little bit,” he said. “For me, when it comes to playing football, you can always run for a first down or whatever you’ve got to do. But it’s not drifting in the pocket, not putting extra stress on these guys up front and just going though in a balanced setting and trying to hang in there the best way possible.’



https://www.orlandosentinel.com/2024/06/22/tampa-bay-bucs-baker-mayfield-nfl-offseason/
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