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Commonwealth Games Federation prepares to include The Gambia at Gold Coast 2018

Commonwealth Games Federation prepares to include The Gambia at Gold Coast 2018

12/03/2018, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 26048838
 
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Media Release

Commonwealth Games Federation prepares to include The Gambia at Gold Coast 2018

MEDIA RELEASE EMBARGOED UNTIL 00.01  (UK) MONDAY 12 MARCH 2018

Sports leaders from across the Commonwealth will be encouraged to welcome and approve the reintroduction of The Gambia to the Commonwealth Games Federation at its General Assembly on Australia’s Gold Coast on 31 March. The move - which follows the Commonwealth Secretariat’s announcement on 8 February that the African nation had been reinstated - would see six athletes approved for participation at the upcoming Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games.
 
Commonwealth Games Federation President Louise Martin CBE said: “Following The Gambia’s welcome return to the Commonwealth, announced last month, we have raced against the clock to put forward a resolution at our upcoming General Assembly – in line with our Constitution – to approve the nation’s application to re-join the Commonwealth Games Federation. The prospect of The Gambia’s return to the Commonwealth Games is an exciting one and continues the momentum that is currently with the Commonwealth. I urge all our members to carefully consider the proposed resolution and pave the way for Team Gambia to compete on the Gold Coast in just 22 days’ time. To bring The Gambia back into the Commonwealth Games family would be a great achievement at a hugely exciting and significant time for our resurgent Commonwealth.”
 
The Gambian Government withdrew from the Commonwealth in October 2013, therefore missing the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. However, the nation’s new Prime Minister, Adama Barrow, elected in December 2016, swiftly re-applied to join the voluntary association of nations and territories committed to democracy, development and human rights.
 
A Gambian team last participated at the Delhi 2010 Commonwealth Games, fielding athletes in Athletics, Boxing and Wrestling. Their first and only Games medal was a bronze in High Jump won by Sheikh Tidiane Faye on their very first Games outing in Edinburgh 1970. Gold Coast 2018 would be The Gambia’s 11th Games appearance and, upon approval at the General Assembly, the Gambia National Olympic Committee will act as the Commonwealth Games Association (CGA).
 
Gambia National Olympic Committee President, Dodou. J. Joof said: “Since the formal announcement from the Government and Commonwealth Secretariat in February, we have been working closely with the Commonwealth Games Federation to explore and approve the participation of Team Gambia at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. We appreciate that it is a last-minute dash, but the opportunity for our athletes to compete at the Games on the world stage on the Gold Coast is just too important to miss. We thank everyone for their support and look forward to a positive decision on 31 March. In the meantime, all our efforts are focused on selecting and preparing six athletes in readiness for competition in Australia”.
 
Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Chairman Peter Beattie said: GOLDOC is pleased to welcome The Gambia back into the Commonwealth and even more pleased to have a team represented on the Gold Coast in April. The diversity of the Commonwealth is what makes the Games so special, so it is great to have another wonderful African nation competing. In a matter of weeks, we will be welcoming teams into the Athletes Village and I personally look forward to welcoming Gambia's athletes”.
CGF announces Gold Coast 2018 will be the most gender equal major multi-sports event in history

CGF announces Gold Coast 2018 will be the most gender equal major multi-sports event in history

09/03/2018, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 26017372
 
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Media Release

 
CGF announces Gold Coast 2018 will be the most gender equal major multi-sports event in history

Gender parity in the number of medal events between women and men for first time ever: 133 Women’s events; 133 Men’s events; 9 Mixed/Open events

Basketball, Hockey and Swimming to feature over 50% female Technical Officials: a first in international sport

Launch of first Women’s Coaching Internship Programme will build women’s coaching capacity across Commonwealth


For immediate release, 8 March 2018
 
With just four weeks to go until the start of Gold Coast 2018, and to mark International Women’s Day, the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) today announced that the XXI edition of the Commonwealth Games will be the most gender equal in major multi-sport event history.

Equal Medals for Women and Men
For the first time ever, there will be an equal number of women’s and men’s medal events at a Commonwealth Games. As a core part of the CGF’s far-reaching gender equality strategy, the Federation approved seven additional women’s event categories to the Gold Coast 2018 sports programme to ensure that men and women compete for an equal number of medals (133 women’s events; 133 men’s events; 9 mixed/open events). The strategy, launched at the 2016 CGF General Assembly in Edmonton, Canada, strives to ensure that women and girls are equally represented, recognised and served across all areas of the Commonwealth Sports Movement. It also sets the benchmark for gender equality standards seen anywhere in international sport.

Louise Martin, President of the CGF said: “International Women’s Day is the right time to reflect on how far we have come with gender equality and how far we still have to go to ensure real balance and fairness in both sport and society. The Commonwealth Sports Movement is proud to be setting the pace for equal gender representation and opportunity in sport, by ensuring that an equal number of medals will be up for grabs at Gold Coast 2018 for women and med. With significant steps forward like this, we believe our unwavering commitment to gender equality is a core value that differentiates the Commonwealth Games from any other international sports movement. Indeed, it is our committed work in areas such as gender equality that make the Commonwealth and Commonwealth Sports Movement more relevant than ever before.

Gender Parity of Technical Officials
For the first time at a major international multi-sport event, the International Federations for Basketball, Hockey and Swimming have confirmed that at least 50% of their technical officials presiding over the sporting action will be women. The announcement supports the collective mission of the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF), the Gold Coast 2018 Organising Corporation (GOLDOC) and its international sporting stakeholders to ensure the that the Games set an international benchmark as the most gender-equal multi-sports event ever seen.

David Grevemberg, Chief Executive Officer of the CGF said: “As a Movement, we are proud to be leading the way in international sport for gender equality. I think we all agree we need to do more to redress the imbalances for women and girls in sport, leadership and society. I am delighted that our committed partners at FIBA, FIH and FINA have joined the CGF to lead the way in sport and ensure a level playing field for women technical officials at Gold Coast 2018. It is also pleasing to see so many other sports make such positive strides to allow more women than ever to preside over sports officiating and judging at the Games”.

The largest jump in female technical officials comes in Rugby Sevens, which will see the number of women officiating at Gold Coast’s Robina Stadium increase to 33% compared to 5% at Glasgow 2014*. A number of other sports have also achieved major progress with significantly more women represented across their pool of technical officials. Wrestling has increased its number of female technical officials from 13% to 32%, whilst increases for other sports include: Lawn Bowls from 28% to 42%; Rhythmic Gymnastics from 86% to 100%; Badminton from 32% to 41%; Triathlon from 33% to 42%; Weightlifting from 34% to 43%; Para Powerlifting from 32% to 39%; Table Tennis from 26% to 32%; and Boxing from 13% to 18%.

As another key component of the Gender Equality Strategy, the number of men officiating at Diving, Netball and Artistic Gymnastics will also increase from 28% to 41%, 21% to 28% and 47% to 53% respectively. The strategy also recognises that longer-term partnerships will be required to develop and ensure the availability of more women technical officials across many sports within the Commonwealth, particularly from smaller nations and territories.

Women’s Coaching Internship Programme
The CGF has also implemented its Women Coaching Internship Programme for Gold Coast 2018. A central part of the CGF’s Gender Equality Strategy, the Women’s Coaching Internship Programme will help build women’s coaching capacity across the Commonwealth, and in turn stand to benefit athletes from all Commonwealth countries and territories.

Under the innovative programme, Commonwealth Games Associations (CGAs), in partnership with one of their National Sports Organisations (NSOs), will have the opportunity to fully integrate an aspiring female coach in their Gold Coast 2018 coaching team. As such, the CGF has reserved 20 quota positions and travel grants for the programme at the Games.

In addition to the recruitment of technical officials, equality of medal opportunities and promotion of coaching opportunities, the CGF Gender Equality Strategy supports and influences the participation and representation of women and girls across broadcast and media, marketing initiatives, volunteering and governance at the 2018 Games and beyond.
 
Sir Roger Bannister – a true giant of Commonwealth Sport

Sir Roger Bannister – a true giant of Commonwealth Sport

08/03/2018, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 26007324
 
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The Commonwealth Column

Sir Roger Bannister – a true giant of Commonwealth Sport

By Louise Martin CBE, CGF President

Everyone across the Commonwealth Sports Movement was deeply saddened to learn of the passing on Saturday of Sir Roger Bannister at the age of 88 at his home in Oxfordshire, England. Roger’s name will forever be synonymous with the Commonwealth and Commonwealth Sport thanks to his part in “the Miracle Mile” - an historic race at the V British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Vancouver, Canada in 1954, which saw Roger and the Australian, John Landy – who at that time remember were the only two sub-four-minute runners in the world - fight to the finish line.
 
Rightfully, Bannister’s defeat of his Australian rival on the last bend of “the Miracle Mile” – in a time of three minutes, 58.8 seconds - has gone down in athletics history. Indeed, his achievement only a couple of months earlier in becoming the first athlete to run a sub-four-minute mile – in three minutes, 59.4 seconds at Iffley Road sports ground in Oxford on May 6, 1954 – became one of the great feats of the twentieth century. Roger’s achievement was all the more remarkable as it followed minimal training and was recorded whilst he was practising as a junior doctor.
 
As a person, Roger was not only good fun but he was great to talk to. Full of stories, life and laughter, I enjoyed the wisdom and wit he displayed on the handful of occasions that I met him. He was a true gentleman; he carried no airs and graces and was liked by all whom he came into contact with. I particularly remember one occasion, many years ago, having a coffee with Chris Chataway – who had paced with Roger to the first sub-four-minute mile in 1954 – and it quickly became apparent from chatting to Chris, who of course knew Roger so well, just how funny and amusing a person Roger was.
 
As I often say, the Commonwealth is a movement brimming with captivating stories of human feat and endeavour - in fact the Commonwealth excels, and one could argue is somewhat unique, in telling these kinds of stories – and, in my view, there is no greater Commonwealth sporting story than that of Sir Roger Bannister. It is no exaggeration to say that Roger was a true ‘giant’ of Commonwealth sport and an icon of international athletics.
 
I know I speak for many colleagues and partners from across the Commonwealth when I say how saddened I was by the news of his passing. Given his feat on the west coast of Canada in 1954, the Commonwealth is a family with which he will forever be synonymous and inextricably linked. Roger, quite literally, set the pace for all sportsmen and women worldwide, and he will be greatly missed by his peers, friends and the entire athletics community. He was undoubtedly an inspiration to us all, young and old.
 
When the Commonwealth Sports Movement gathers on the Gold Coast, Australia to celebrate the XXI Commonwealth Games in just under 30 days’ time, Roger will be well and truly missed, but, as the man who broke the four-minute-mile, he will be proudly remembered for years to come.
 
The Commonwealth’s ability to captivate us

The Commonwealth’s ability to captivate us

12/02/2018, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 25769592
 
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The Commonwealth Column

The Commonwealth’s ability to captivate us

By David Grevemberg CBE, CGF Chief Executive Officer
 
As the temperature dips to minus 8 degrees and the Pyeongchang Olympic Winter Games gets into full swing, you could be forgiven for feeling a world away from Australia’s Gold Coast, which is currently basking in a balmy 28 degrees and warm sunshine. Tomorrow, however, marks just 50-days-to-go until the Games.

What is it that unites these two major international sporting events? The answer is simple.  Whilst the lead up to any Games can sometimes feel dominated by logistics, politics, and a lot of background noise, it is the athletes and teams, and the inspiring stories of how and why they choose to wear their national flag on the global sporting stage which truly captures the public imagination.  It is the athletes and teams who create defining moments that fill us with adrenaline, pride and ambition. In this age of multi-million-dollar commercial sport, it is the human stories – the likes of which dominate the Commonwealth Games on a regular basis – that grab our attention and pull on our heartstrings.

At the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games, there are 15 Commonwealth nations and territories competing, fielding over 350 athletes: from Australia, Canada, Bermuda, Ghana, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Malaysia, Malta, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, Singapore, Tonga and United Kingdom (who compete under the British flag, rather than the component nations and territories of England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man as they do at the Commonwealth Games).

It is no surprise that many of the human stories of commitment, determination and passion are Commonwealth stories, for it is the diverse and dynamic Commonwealth of Nations that has these stories in abundance and tells them so well. The inspiring women of the Nigerian bobsleigh team (Seun Adigun, Akuoma Omeoga and Ngozi Onwumere) making sporting history; the first-ever Ghanian skeleton athlete, Akwasi Frimpong, racing down an icy mountain at 90 miles per hour, telling CNN, “I can motivate kids in Ghana to chase their dreams”; and the former youth-worker and Rio 2016 star Pita Taufatofua who turned from Taekwando to the hardest sport he can find on the snow-less Pacific island of Tonga, cross-country skiing.

Gold Coast 2018, starting in just over 50 days’ time, will be no different. Some of the coldest corners of the Commonwealth – such as the Canadian capital, Ottawa, where the thermometer has been lingering in the minus twenties for days - will stake their claim for greatness as the sun beats down on the Games’ inaugural beach volleyball court; the youngest-ever competitor for Team Wales, and possibly even the Games themselves, Anna Hursey, will take time off school, having qualified to represent her country, aged just 11, in table tennis; the Jamaicans will field their first ever team in the ever-increasingly popular Rugby Sevens; Ugandan women athletes will make sporting history, representing their country for the first time ever at a Commonwealth Games in Netball.

The Commonwealth excels, and one could argue is somewhat unique, in telling these kinds of stories and moments. As the national anthems are played, the flags are carried and raised, it is impossible not to be swept up in the emotion of Commonwealth athletes representing their country, from the smallest Commonwealth member, Nauru, which has a population of just 10,000, to the largest country, India, with over 1.2 billion people.

To these and all Commonwealth Athletes, sport is far more than just competition. Sport connects them – and all of us – with dreams, goals and aspirations for ourselves, our families and our communities. The teams of athletes are a microcosm of the Commonwealth itself. The team colours and flags Commonwealth Athletes wear with pride in competition mark them out as the world’s most diverse fraternity of nations, territories and people. They are the vanguard of a great movement whose purpose has been carried and shared across decades, across generations and across borders.

Through their drive to achieve greatness for themselves, their teams and their loved ones, Commonwealth Athletes stir ambitions and dreams in all of us. On behalf of the entire Commonwealth Sports Movement, the CGF wishes all Commonwealth athletes our very best at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games this week and next; we will support and watch the Commonwealth athletes with pride in what is a truly Commonwealth year. For it is how Commonwealth Athletes make us feel that inspires us to act. They drive the ambition and power of all Commonwealth citizens through sport.
 
The Modern Commonwealth

The Modern Commonwealth

17/01/2018, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 25498789
 
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The Commonwealth Column

The Modern Commonwealth

By Louise Martin CBE, CGF President
 
 

For immediate release, 16 January 2018

Everyone across the Commonwealth Sport Movement believes in the exceptional power of sport as a force for good. A force that brings us together, reconciles our differences and has the inspiring potential to change lives for the better. A force that drives our commitment to humanity, equality and destiny. A force that encapsulates our passion for and belief in the triumphant, generous spirit of humanity.
 
We are seeing this every day, in action, as the Gold Coast 2018 Queen’s Baton Relay visits every terrain and time zone of the Commonwealth. The Baton is a powerful, celebratory and tangible symbol of today’s Commonwealth Games – carrying Her Majesty’s message of peace and unity – and celebrating and showcasing today’s Modern Commonwealth as it is passed from athletes to citizens, community leaders to school children.
 
Indeed, this message and this vision brings to life the Commonwealth itself - a voluntary association of 70 nations and territories. Among our membership are some of the world’s largest and smallest countries, from India, with over 1.2 billion people to Nauru with a population of just 10,000.  Our combined population of 2.4 billion represents a third of the world’s total population. More than 60% of Commonwealth citizens are under the age of 30.
 
The Commonwealth Charter brings together the values and aspirations which unite our diverse membership, outlining our joint commitment to democracy, human rights and the rule of law, to promote peace and prosperity and to improve the lives of all peoples of the Commonwealth. No matter the person’s race or religion, sexual orientation or gender identification, all people of the Modern Commonwealth should be treated equally.
 
In recent times, our Federation has done a lot of soul-searching to look at our impact and meaning. It is no accident that we built upon the very foundations of the Commonwealth, as enshrined in the Commonwealth Charter, to define what sets us apart as a thriving, relevant and modern sporting movement. In fact, I would argue that today, in 2018, the Commonwealth is more relevant than at any time in history.
 
In 2010, the Commonwealth Sport Movement reached a challenging chapter in its existence – when the very word and purpose of the ‘Commonwealth’ was questioned and the negative impacts of a Games on a host community were highlighted.
 
On the back of an extensive strategic review, and through a collaborative approach of cross sector partnerships at the local, national and global level - we all sought to change the script for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games and beyond – reflecting on who and what the Commonwealth Family is and why a Mega Sporting Event of the Commonwealth Games’ stature was so crucial to the modern world.  
 
This led us to being very explicit about the value we place on host communities and citizens, and the positive impact we seek to achieve in all that we do:
  • From protecting, promoting and safeguarding clean athletes
  • From publishing pre-Games and post-Games Human Rights reports
  • To embracing the fair living wage
  • To procuring ethically and sustainably, and implementing community benefit clauses in our tenders and contracts
  • To changing the face of accessibility standards and services for events and tourism
  • To actively promoting LGBT rights and embracing diversity every single step of the way
  • To promoting and fundraising for children’s rights through a global partnership with UNICEF – where £6m was raised for children during our Opening Ceremony in Glasgow

These are just some examples of how one city, in one nation with the power of one Games made a difference. And we have capitalised on this momentum and formalised this ambition into our own strategic plan, Transformation 2022.
 
Today, the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) is far more than the curator of a great Games. Our strategic blueprint marks a historic change in the movement’s focus from the four-year cycle of overseeing the Commonwealth Games to a wider, ambitious role of delivering sports leadership within the Commonwealth, based on partnership, engagement and value generation.
 
The Commonwealth Games on Australia’s Gold Coast in April will demonstrate just how far we have come, and how committed we are to ensure that the benefits of the Games stretch beyond the thrilling impact of 11 days of sport. All our efforts are focused on delivering worldwide recognition and respect for the Gold Coast and Queensland, jobs and economic growth, community engagement right across Australia and, above all, the promise of greater reconciliation and social justice. It’s why Gold Coast 2018 will be the first Mega Sporting Event in Australia with a Reconciliation Action Plan, why Festival 2018 will celebrate the diverse and dynamic cultures of the Commonwealth, and why we’re proud to become the first multi-sport event in the world to create a truly level playing-field of gender equality – with an exactly equal number of medal opportunities for men and women. These very clear examples of progress are the reason the resurgent Commonwealth Sport Movement is alive, and thriving, today. These societal-driven causes are the Commonwealth Sport Movement’s raison d'être in the twenty-first century, and why we stand apart from any other sporting movement or institution worldwide.
 
With 6,500 athletes and officials from every corner of the Commonwealth, Gold Coast 2018 will be an inspiring and inclusive festival of community, culture and sport. It will be a loud and proud celebration of today’s Modern Commonwealth, and for that very reason we can all be excited.
2018 is The Commonwealth’s Year

2018 is The Commonwealth’s Year

14/01/2018, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 25467670
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Media Release

2018 is The Commonwealth’s Year

New Year’s Message from the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth Games Federation


Dear Athletes, Fans and Colleagues across the Commonwealth and beyond,

On behalf of the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) and entire Commonwealth Sport Movement, we wish you all a very happy and prosperous New Year. As we begin another year, we would like to take this opportunity to speak of our excitement for the twelve months that lie ahead.

It is important to acknowledge that 2017 was a challenging year for the Commonwealth Sports Movement, as in March we had to make the very difficult, but necessary, decision to explore alternative options for the hosting of the 2022 Commonwealth Games, after Durban, South Africa was unable to honour its original bid commitments. This is not a decision any international governing body wants to make, particularly as we had and have such strong ambitions to bring the Games to African soil for the very first time. However, the expressions of interest we received to host the 2022 Games from 11 cities across the Commonwealth reinforced the current relevance and resonance of our Movement. Shortly before Christmas, we were delighted to announce the Executive Board’s decision to select the city of Birmingham, England as our 2022 Commonwealth Games Host City Partner. With its rich cultural diversity, youthful dynamism and ambitious spirit, Birmingham is truly a great Commonwealth city, and therefore will be a very fitting location to host the XXII edition of the Games.

As we look ahead, with the XXI Commonwealth Games taking place in Gold Coast, Australia in just over twelve weeks’ time, preparations for Birmingham 2022 now underway, Commonwealth Day (Monday, 12 March) fast approaching as well as the hosting of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) by the United Kingdom in London the week immediately following our Games, this year looks to be hugely important in the Federation’s 88-year history. Indeed, for the whole of the Commonwealth and its Sport Movement, 2018 is very much the Commonwealth’s Year.

With the power to positively impact societies through sport, the Commonwealth has never been more relevant than it is today. Take the work we have all done as the international sport leader in respecting, protecting and promoting human rights through our UNICEF partnership– which to date has positively impacted the lives of 11.6 million children Commonwealth-wide; or how we are leading the way in advocating reconciliation initiatives with indigenous people. We are emerging as the true global sport leader for gender equality issues, by openly addressing the imbalances existing in our sport Movement for female participation and representation. Along with the Gold Coast Organising Committee (GOLDOC), it is our collective mission to make Gold Coast 2018 one of the most gender-equal multi-sports event in history by: promoting greater gender parity of technical officials; ensuring gender parity in the number of medal events, so that for the first time men and women will compete for an equal number of medals; and by implementing the CGF’s Women’s Coaching Internship Programme, which will grow the capacity of female coaches across the Commonwealth. In all that we do, our Movement represents sport with a social conscience.

Last year, the CGF incorporated three entities.  In addition to becoming a UK limited company, both the Commonwealth Sport Foundation (CSF) and CGF Partnerships (CGFP) have been established. Once fully functioning in 2018/2019, the Foundation will fund programmes and projects that contribute to the sustainable development of sport throughout the Commonwealth. CGFP is the pioneering joint venture established with Lagardère Sports last July, to deliver the CGF’s new Games delivery model and Games commercial programmes. CGFP has commenced its work in earnest, as the preparations for Birmingham 2022 have begun.

Throughout the Commonwealth and the wider world, we can all eagerly look forward to Gold Coast 2018 beginning in just 86 days’ time. We have every confidence that Gold Coast 2018 will welcome athletes and fans alike with open arms, when the Games officially open on 4 April.

We look forward to our work with many of you over the coming year, as we continue to demonstrate to our friends across the world the strong relevance, passion and spirit of our Commonwealth Sport Movement.

Louise Martin CBE
CGF President

David Grevemberg CBE
CGF Chief Executive Officer
CGF Statement on 2022 Commonwealth Games Host City bid process

CGF Statement on 2022 Commonwealth Games Host City bid process

07/12/2017, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 25091062
 
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Media Release

CGF Statement on 2022 Commonwealth Games Host City bid process

For immediate release, 6 December 2017

The Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) Executive Board today received an update from the Federation’s Evaluation Panel chaired by CGF President Louise Martin. The Panel was established to review and recommend the selection of the host for the XXII edition of the Commonwealth Games in 2022.

Since the Executive Board was empowered by the CGF General Assembly in October 2016 to identify an alternative 2022 Games host to Durban, South Africa, the CGF has undertaken a thorough and collaborative process involving a number of Commonwealth Games Associations (CGAs) and their governments. This process has involved the consideration of eight different cities to host the 2022 Games. Recently, the Executive Board took the decision to extend the process beyond 30 September 2017 to enable cities more time to develop their hosting propositions.

Today, from the 2018 Commonwealth Games Coordination Commission meeting on the Gold Coast, Australia, CGF President Louise Martin provided an update to the Executive Board. Following the President’s update, the Executive Board determined that it required further clarification on a range of issues identified by the Evaluation Panel before it can appoint a host city for 2022.

Louise Martin, President of the CGF said: “When the CGF General Assembly took the difficult decision to reallocate the 2022 Commonwealth Games, it delegated the Federation’s Executive Board the responsibility to award the Games. It is essential that we have fully examined all aspects of the cities’ bid submissions and expressions of interest, and that we are fully satisfied that the ultimate host for 2022 is capable of staging a Games that fully delivers for Commonwealth athletes and host communities.

“The CGF is close to making a decision to select the host city of the 2022 Games. We thank all nations who have participated in the process. We are also close to achieving significant Games legacy objectives, however we have been asked to provide a little more time in order for these to be realised, and in the interest of good partnership we have decided to allow this.

“The CGF is confident that we will make a final decision regarding the selection of a host city for 2022 before the year-end, but we will continue to remain flexible and collaborative in a true sense of partnership with potential hosts so that, above all, we have a decision that the entire Commonwealth can get behind.”
CGF Statement on 2022 Commonwealth Games host city bid process

CGF Statement on 2022 Commonwealth Games host city bid process

02/12/2017, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 25038888
 
 

CGF Statement on 2022 Commonwealth Games host city bid process

 
Over the last two months, since the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) Executive Board’s decision to extend the deadline for the 2022 Commonwealth Games selection process, updates have been received from Australia, Canada, England and Malaysia. The CGF wishes to thank all four countries for the interest that they have shown in hosting the Commonwealth Games.

In terms of next steps, the CGF Executive Board will receive an update from the CGF Evaluation Panel and the CGF Review Team at its meeting on 6 December. An update regarding the selection of a host city for the 2022 Commonwealth Games will be provided following the board meeting.
 
     

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Inspiring line-up of Commonwealth sporting leaders comprise first-ever CGF Athletes Advisory Commission

Inspiring line-up of Commonwealth sporting leaders comprise first-ever CGF Athletes Advisory Commission

25/10/2017, International, Multi Sports, Commonwealth Games Federation, Article # 24585049
 
 

Inspiring line-up of Commonwealth sporting leaders comprise first-ever CGF Athletes Advisory Commission

 
For immediate release, 24 October 2017

With less than six months to go to the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, the Commonwealth Games Federation has launched its first-ever Athletes Advisory Commission to engage and represent athlete views and help understand and grow the profile, meaning and impact of Commonwealth Athletes. As an integral part of the CGF governance and management structure it will be an influential voice to strengthen the links between athletes, administrators and Games organisers.

CGF President Louise Martin CBE said:
“Commonwealth athletes are ambassadors of a great movement whose purpose has been carried and shared across decades, across generations and across borders. As we recognised in Transformation 2022, the creation of an Athletes Advisory Commission affirms our commitment to being an athlete-centred, sport-focused movement.  We are thrilled and thankful that such a diverse and decorated group of inspiring sports leaders, representing each of our regions, will help shape the future direction of this vitally important initiative through Gold Coast 2018 and beyond.”

The Commission will be chaired and represented on the CGF Executive Board by Rhona Simpson, Scotland’s most-decorated Hockey player and former athlete at the 1998, 2002 and 2006 Commonwealth Games. The inaugural commission was selected at the recent CGF Executive Board meeting in Colombo, Sri Lanka, after a regional nomination process, bringing together a highly-accomplished group of Commonwealth athletes and medallists with significant previous Games and sports, civic and academic leadership experience. In addition to Rhona Simpson, the Commission members are:
 
  • Ms Natalie Du Toit (para-sport representative): South Africa, Swimming, seven-time Commonwealth Gold medallist at 2002, 2006 and 2010 Games;
  • Dr Nicole Forrester: Canada, Athletics (High Jump), Commonwealth Gold medal (2010) and Bronze (2002);
  • Mr Colin Gregor: Scotland, Rugby Sevens, 2006 and 2014 Games and Captain from 2009-2014;
  • Mr E Niluka Rushan Karunaratne: Sri Lanka, Badminton, 2006, 2010 and 2014 Games;
  • Mr Lechezdani Luza: Botswana, Boxing (51kg), 2006 and Commonwealth Silver medallist at 2002 Games;
  • Ms Alison Shanks: New Zealand, Track Cycling, 2006 and Commonwealth Gold medallist (3000m Individual Pursuit) at 2010 Games;
  • Mr Brendan Williams: Dominica, Athletics (High Jump), 2010 and 2014 Games.
 
The Commission was selected to ensure an optimum mix of skills and competencies and balanced representation in relation to region, team and individual sports and para-sport. Women and men are equally represented with four positions each, supporting the Federation’s commitment to gender equality. Members will hold office for a period not exceeding four years and shall be eligible to serve a maximum of two consecutive terms. The Commission will meet in person for the first time on the Gold Coast next April.
 
CGF Athlete Representative and Athletes Advisory Commission Chair Rhona Simpson said: “We have been given a far-reaching mandate to not just participate in Games and board decision-making but empower Commonwealth athletes to advance the aims and objectives of the Commonwealth Sports Movement. I’d like to sincerely thank all of the newly-appointed Commission members, and I look forward to working alongside them to help develop and deliver the best and most inclusive-possible sporting experience for Commonwealth athletes at all levels”.
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