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					Lindsey Vonn on who she’s excited to watch in Tokyo Olympics & advice for 2021 Olymp

Lindsey Vonn on who she’s excited to watch in Tokyo Olympics & advice for 2021 Olymp

24/06/2021, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 30368793
Former Olympian Lindsey Vonn reveals who she is most excited to watch in the upcoming summer Tokyo Olympics. In her conversation with Charlotte Wilder, Vonn describes the mental toughness it takes to be an Olympian, how she dealt with stress, and advice she'd give to the athletes competing.

https://www.foxsports.com/olympics/video/1912821315898
The IOC, UN Women, UNESCO, P&G and NBC Sports are changing the conversation about women in sport

The IOC, UN Women, UNESCO, P&G and NBC Sports are changing the conversation about women in sport

16/03/2018, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 26093223
 

International Olympic Committee Press Release

 

 
 
March 15, 2018

The IOC, UN Women, UNESCO, P&G and NBC Sports are changing the conversation about women in sport

On the margins of the 62nd Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, the International Olympic Committee (IOC), UN Women, UNESCO, Procter & Gamble and NBC hosted an event focusing on “Racing Towards Gender Equality: The media’s portrayal of women athletes and its effects on women’s participation in sports” on Wednesday 14 March.

The event, moderated by acclaimed NBC Sports commentator Andrea Joyce, brought together athletes, gender equality experts, public and private sector representatives, media, and other Olympic Movement stakeholders to highlight the importance of balanced media portrayal in ensuring equal representation of women and men in sports. Featured speakers included Donna de Varona – two-time Olympic gold medallist in swimming, Emmy-winning sports broadcaster, activist and IOC Women in Sport Commission member – as well as Maia Shibutani – two-time Olympic bronze medallist, three-time World Championship medallist and two-time US national champion in ice dancing.

“We are all here to change the conversation about women in sport,” said IOC Strategic Communications Director and event host Rebecca Lowell Edwards. “We cannot truly be ‘Faster, Higher, Stronger’ when half of us are not proportionally represented on the playing field, in an official uniform, in commissions and federations, or with a coach’s whistle. We know progress will take a true team effort, and that’s why we joined together today with wonderful partners, each with a superb track record of empowering women and girls around the world.”

The event continued with perspectives from Donna de Varona and Maia Shibutani, leading Olympic athletes from two different generations. Both athletes expressed hope for the future of women in sport, highlighting the progress that has been made to remove barriers, and the need to do more. “I’ve been fortunate to have my brother as my skating partner,” commented Shibutani. “As soon as we step on the ice as a team, we know we are on an even playing field and respect each other. Having that support is amazing, and that’s what the standard should be.”

 “This discussion has been happening for a very long time and now is the time to act,” added de Varona. “We need a platform that drives this agenda, and the Olympic Movement is filling that void today. We’ve done great in the field of play, but need to do the same in leadership and decision-making.”

The athletes’ discussion was followed by a panel featuring gender equality champions from public and private sector partners, including Khetsiwe Dlamini, UN Women Chief of Staff and acting Director of the Strategic Partnerships Division; Marc S. Pritchard, Chief Brand Officer, Procter & Gamble; and Saniye Gülser Corat, Director of the Division of Gender Equality, UNESCO.

“We want to see Planet 50-50 – a gender-equal world - by 2030, which is the target date for the Sustainable Development Goals,” said Dlamini. “The race to gender equality by 2030 is enabled by sport. It's a race against poverty, hunger, lack of access to health, education and leadership. It's a race toward gender equality. It's urgent that we finish the race. This means equal opportunities to play, equal pay, and equal representation of women and girls in sport. With the IOC, we make an unstoppable team.”

Representing one of the leading private sector advocates for women’s empowerment, Pritchard talked about how P&G uses its advertising power to help eliminate gender bias. “We as a company decided to make a real difference in gender equality because we believe there should be equal representation, equal jobs, equal pay, equal respect,” he explained. “That’s when we committed to use our voice in advertising as a way to promote gender equality. Our goal is Ads can be a force for good because they can promote positive conversations, influence attitudes, and change behaviour to help make our world a better place. And, when the world is more equal, it leads to more growth.”

“Only four per cent of sports media content is devoted to women’s sports, and only 12 per cent of sports news is presented by women,” continued Corat. “Sports coverage is hugely powerful in shaping norms and stereotypes about gender. The media has the ability to challenge these norms, covering more women’s competitions and training, including more women as sports broadcasters, and promoting a fair portrayal of sportspeople irrespective of gender.”

The IOC has put gender equality at the centre of its mission and made great strides in advancing gender parity in the sporting arena and beyond. Today, more female athletes participate in the Olympic Games than ever before. As an example, the first edition of the Olympic Winter Games in Chamonix in 1924 featured just 13 women, all of them figure skaters. Almost a century later, at PyeongChang 2018, a record 1,242 female athletes were in action, making up 42 per cent of all the competitors. Recently, the IOC Executive Board approved 25 key recommendations from the IOC Gender Equality Review Project, which focus on changing the conversation about women in sport holistically – from participation to representation and decision-making.

“The 25 recommendations are right on point in getting us to where we want to be,” said de Varona. “But change doesn’t come from just putting a policy out there. We need to make sure they are implemented successfully.”

IOC’s event partners are also at the forefront of efforts to eliminate gender barriers using the power of sport. Among UN Women’s many initiatives, “One Win Leads to Another” builds the leadership skills of adolescent girls through quality sports programmes, improving their ability to influence decisions that impact their lives at all levels. P&G works with athletes and organisations globally, and creates ground-breaking campaigns like #LoveOverBias to spark conversations and raise greater awareness about gender equality.

Through its involvement in the #SeeHer campaign, NBC Sports is committed to celebrating America’s female athletes and increasing their visibility across its platforms. On World Radio Day 2018, UNESCO and radio stations globally called for fairer coverage of sportswomen through their #HerMomentsMatter campaign, and are continuing the call through their Women Make the News initiative Her Headline. 

To watch key highlights from the 14 March event on media and gender equality, visit https://www.facebook.com/unwomen.

To learn more about the IOC’s efforts in advancing gender equality, go to the IOC Gender Equality E-Platform. To participate in the social media conversation, use the hash tags #RacingtoGenderEquality and #IOCGenderEquality.

###

IOC

The International Olympic Committee was created in 1894 and remains committed over 100 years later to building a better world through sport.  With the release of its latest report of the IOC Gender Equality Project and 25 Recommendations, the IOC continues to address the challenges of creating greater access and opportunities for women and girls to participate in sport, and thus ensure dialogue, action and change through gender equality.

UN Women

UN Women is the UN organisation dedicated to gender equality and the empowerment of women. A global champion for women and girls, UN Women also coordinates and promotes the UN system’s work in advancing gender equality, and in all deliberations and agreements linked to the 2030 Agenda, working to position gender equality as fundamental to the Sustainable Development Goals and a more inclusive world.

UNESCO 

UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) is responsible for coordinating international cooperation in key areas to build peace in the minds of men and women.  Gender equality is a global priority for UNESCO and inextricably linked to its efforts to promote free, independent and pluralistic media, including gender equality in media operations and content.

P&G 

P&G (Procter and Gamble) serves consumers in over 180 countries around the world with one of the strongest portfolios of trusted, quality, leadership brands.  With operations in 70 countries and a Worldwide Olympic Partner, P&G is working with athletes and organisations globally to help create a better world – free from gender bias and with an equal voice and equal representation for women and men – by using its voice, influence, reach and ground-breaking campaigns like #LoveOverBias to spark conversations and raise greater awareness about gender equality.

NBC Sports Group

NBC Sports Group serves sports fans 24/7 with premier live events, insightful studio shows, and compelling original programming. The sports media company consists of NBC Sports, NBC Olympics, NBCSN, Golf Channel, NBC Sports Regional Networks, NBC Sports Radio and NBC Sports Digital, which includes NBCSports.comNBCOlympics.comGolfChannel.com, the digital assets of the NBC Sports Regional Networks, Rotoworld, the NBC Sports Talk franchise, multiple apps, and two transactional sports businesses, GolfNow and SportsEngine.

IOC Statement

IOC Statement

01/03/2018, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 25935367
 

International Olympic Committee Press Release

 

 
 
February 28, 2018

IOC Statement

The final notification of all remaining test results from the Olympic Athlete from Russia (OAR) delegation has been received from the Doping-Free Sport Unit (DFSU).

The IOC can confirm that all the remaining results are negative.

Therefore, as stated in the Executive Board decision of 25th February the suspension of the Russian Olympic Committee is automatically lifted with immediate effect.

PyeongChang Olympians elect two new members to IOC Athletes’ Commission

PyeongChang Olympians elect two new members to IOC Athletes’ Commission

23/02/2018, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 25875928
 

International Olympic Committee Press Release

 

 
 
February 22, 2018

PyeongChang Olympians elect two new members to IOC Athletes’ Commission

Emma Terho from Finland (ice hockey) and Kikkan Randall from USA (cross-country skiing) have been elected to the International Olympic Committee (IOC)’s Athletes’ Commission by their fellow Olympians at the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018.

With a record participation rate of 83.86 per cent, athletes at the Olympic Winter Games made their way to the voting booths in the Athlete365 Space in both the PyeongChang and Gangneung Olympic Villages to cast their votes. Terho was elected with 1,045 votes, followed by Randall with 831 votes.

For the full list of results, click here. 

The announcement was made today at the Olympic Village by IOC Executive Board Member and Chair of the Election Committee Nicole Hoevertsz, Swedish IOC Athletes’ Commission member Stefan Holm and IOC Sports Director Kit McConnell. 

Terho represented Finland at five Olympic Winter Games, winning bronze at Nagano 1998 and Vancouver 2010. Randall, meanwhile, is currently competing in her fifth Winter Games in PyeongChang. Earlier this week, she won the USA's first-ever Olympic gold medal in cross-country skiing, after topping the podium in the team sprint event alongside Jessica Diggins.

Following approval by the IOC Session, to take place on the last day of the Games, Terho and Randall will become Commission and IOC Members for an eight-year term, representing their fellow Olympians on the IOC Athletes’ Commission, which serves as a link between the athletes and the IOC.

They will replace current IOC Athletes’ Commission Chair Angela Ruggiero and Adam Pengilly, whose terms are finishing following their election at the Olympic Winter Games Vancouver 2010.

All 2,930 athletes competing in PyeongChang were eligible to vote and had six candidates to choose from representing three continents and five different sports. They were asked to cast votes for two different athletes from two different sports. 

Prior to the start of the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018, Kirsty Coventry was appointed as the incoming Chair of the Athletes’ Commission following a vote of confidence from her fellow members.

Coventry has been a member of the IOC Athletes’ Commission since 2012, and has played a significant role in developing the Commission’s new strategy, which was presented by the current Chair, Angela Ruggiero, at the International Athletes’ Forum last November.

Also confirmed recently was the appointment of Danka Bartekova as the Vice Chair of the Commission. Bartekova has been instrumental in the delivery of Athlete365, a new overarching brand that brings together all the IOC athlete-focused communication strands.

Visit: www.olympic.org/athlete365 to learn more

Winning medal design to light up Buenos Aires 2018

Winning medal design to light up Buenos Aires 2018

01/02/2018, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 25657954

 

International Olympic Committee Press Release

 

 
 
January 31, 2018

Winning medal design to light up Buenos Aires 2018

The winning entry of the International Olympic Committee (IOC)'s Medal Design Competition for the Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018 has been chosen. It was submitted by 18-year-old Muhamad Farid Husen from Indonesia, and is entitled "Fireworks of Victory".

Chosen from close to 300 entries from over 50 nations, from Algeria to Venezuela, the winning design was picked by a panel of judges made up of Young Change-Makers, Young Reporters and IOC Members.

Medal Design Competition winner Muhamad Farid Husen commented on his win: "It is really an honour for me to be a little part of Youth Olympic Games. I can't describe how my feeling is…being the designer of the medals which is used by all the winners of the Youth Olympics is an honour for me. My dream came true."

He said of his design: "This medal was inspired by fireworks. Fireworks representing the excitement and the glory of the Youth Olympic Games where all nations come together as one to participate and celebrate. Fireworks fly to the sky, giving the reflection of how the young athletes are reaching their dreams." 

IOC Member and Olympian, judge Aya Medany commented: "Muhamad's design really touched my heart as an athlete. The most important thing is to celebrate after winning, and it's nothing better than to celebrate with fireworks. It's also amazing to have the winner the same age as the participants in the YOG."

Competition judge and Young Change-Maker, Emily A. Yeh said: "The winning design gives an energetic feel with unlimited possibilities, which is also what we hope to see from the YOG athletes and the young generation."

Fellow judge and Young Change-Maker, Nina Balaban said: "This has been an amazing project. [It is] empowering the young artists to spread their wings and learn more about the Olympic values."

Winner Muhamad, the youngest-ever entrant to win the competition since the first edition in 2010, will attend the Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018, including the Opening Ceremony, and witness first-hand athletes being awarded medals featuring his design. In addition, he will receive his own set of medals and a Samsung tablet.

The judges also selected two runner-up designs. In second place was "Making Waves" by Patrick Nair, 20, from the USA; and in third place "Victory Road" by 28-year-old Damien Perrin from Switzerland.

For more information on the Youth Olympic Games and opportunities to get involved go to www.buenosaires2018.com.

International Olympic Committee Press Release

View this press release online

 
 
January 31, 2018

Winning medal design to light up Buenos Aires 2018

The winning entry of the International Olympic Committee (IOC)'s Medal Design Competition for the Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018 has been chosen. It was submitted by 18-year-old Muhamad Farid Husen from Indonesia, and is entitled "Fireworks of Victory".

Chosen from close to 300 entries from over 50 nations, from Algeria to Venezuela, the winning design was picked by a panel of judges made up of Young Change-Makers, Young Reporters and IOC Members.

Medal Design Competition winner Muhamad Farid Husen commented on his win: "It is really an honour for me to be a little part of Youth Olympic Games. I can't describe how my feeling is…being the designer of the medals which is used by all the winners of the Youth Olympics is an honour for me. My dream came true."

He said of his design: "This medal was inspired by fireworks. Fireworks representing the excitement and the glory of the Youth Olympic Games where all nations come together as one to participate and celebrate. Fireworks fly to the sky, giving the reflection of how the young athletes are reaching their dreams." 

IOC Member and Olympian, judge Aya Medany commented: "Muhamad's design really touched my heart as an athlete. The most important thing is to celebrate after winning, and it's nothing better than to celebrate with fireworks. It's also amazing to have the winner the same age as the participants in the YOG."

Competition judge and Young Change-Maker, Emily A. Yeh said: "The winning design gives an energetic feel with unlimited possibilities, which is also what we hope to see from the YOG athletes and the young generation."

Fellow judge and Young Change-Maker, Nina Balaban said: "This has been an amazing project. [It is] empowering the young artists to spread their wings and learn more about the Olympic values."

Winner Muhamad, the youngest-ever entrant to win the competition since the first edition in 2010, will attend the Youth Olympic Games Buenos Aires 2018, including the Opening Ceremony, and witness first-hand athletes being awarded medals featuring his design. In addition, he will receive his own set of medals and a Samsung tablet.

The judges also selected two runner-up designs. In second place was "Making Waves" by Patrick Nair, 20, from the USA; and in third place "Victory Road" by 28-year-old Damien Perrin from Switzerland.

For more information on the Youth Olympic Games and opportunities to get involved go to www.buenosaires2018.com.

IOC President to convene

IOC President to convene "North and South Korean Olympic Participation Meeting"

11/01/2018, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 25436913
 

International Olympic Committee Press Release

 

 
 
January 10, 2018

IOC President to convene "North and South Korean Olympic Participation Meeting"

The IOC President, Thomas Bach, today called for a meeting to decide on the participation of athletes from the National Olympic Committee (NOC) of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) at the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018.  It follows the joint proposals (yesterday) by the governments of the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

In order to decide on the proposals, the IOC will convene a four-party meeting on Saturday 20 January 2018 at the IOC headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.  The participants will be a delegation from the PyeongChang 2018 Organising Committee and delegations from the NOCs of the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, all led by their respective presidents, as well as high-ranking government officials and the IOC Members in both countries.  The meeting will be chaired by the IOC President.

The meeting will have to take a series of essential decisions, including the number and names of athletes and officials from the NOC of the DPRK, since all the deadlines for registration have already passed. The IOC will also have to decide on the format of such participation, including questions related to the official protocol (flag, anthem, ceremonies, uniform, etc.).

“I warmly welcome the joint proposals by the governments of the ROK and DPRK, which have been applauded by so many other governments worldwide. This is a great step forward in the Olympic spirit and in the spirit of the Olympic Truce Resolution passed by the General Assembly of the United Nations. Now the IOC must take the decisions to make this political commitment a reality,” said the IOC President.

###

The International Olympic Committee is a not-for-profit independent international organisation made up of volunteers, which is committed to building a better world through sport. It redistributes more than 90 per cent of its income to the wider sporting movement, which means that every day the equivalent of 3.4 million US dollars goes to help athletes and sports organisations at all levels around the world.

IOC sanctions 11 Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings

IOC sanctions 11 Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings

23/12/2017, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 25264033

 

International Olympic Committee Press Release

 

 
 
December 22, 2017

IOC sanctions 11 Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings

Today, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has published 11 new decisions from the Oswald Commission hearings, which are being conducted in the context of the Sochi 2014 forensic and analytic doping investigations.

As a result, the following Russian athletes have been sanctioned:

- Speed skaters Ivan SKOBREV and Artem KUZNETCOV

- Lugers Tatyana IVANOVA and Albert DEMCHENKO, silver medallists in Sochi 2014

- Cross-country skiers Nikita KRYUKOV, Alexander BESSMERTNYKH and Natalia MATVEEVA

- Bobsledders Liudmila UDOBKINA and Maxim BELUGIN

- Ice hockey players Tatiana BURINA and Anna SHCHUKINA

To date, the number of cases opened by the Disciplinary Commission has reached 46 after additional findings from the re-analyses. All 46 of them have been handled, of which three have been filed. As some investigations are still ongoing (notably the forensic analysis of the bottles), it cannot be excluded that there might be new elements that would justify opening further new cases and holding more hearings.

The IOC Disciplinary Commission, composed for these 11 cases of Mr Denis Oswald (Chairman), Mrs Gunilla Lindberg and Mr Patrick Baumann, decided the following:

Maxim BELUGIN, Alexander BESSMERTNYKH, Tatiana BURINA, Albert DEMCHENKO, Tatyana IVANOVA, Nikita KRYUKOV, Artem KUZNETCOV, Natalia MATVEEVA, Anna SHCHUKINA, Ivan SKOBREV, and Liudmila UDOBKINA are found to have committed anti-doping rule violations pursuant to Article 2 of The International Olympic Committee Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, in 2014, and are disqualified from the events in which they participated.

In addition, the 11 athletes are declared ineligible to be accredited in any capacity for all editions of the Games of the Olympiad and the Olympic Winter Games subsequent to the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014.

The reasoning for these decisions will be communicated in due course.

For further details, please consult the following factsheet.

The Disciplinary Commission, chaired by IOC Member Denis Oswald, is responsible for investigating the alleged doping violations by individual Russian athletes. Therefore, all the samples collected from Russian athletes at the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014 that were available to the IOC were re-analysed. This had two goals: to further review the samples for evidence of doping, and separately to determine if the samples themselves or the bottles were manipulated or tampered with.

Due to the nature and complexity of the cases, this thorough, comprehensive and time-consuming process has taken several months and had to involve external forensic experts, who had to develop a legally-defendable methodology for all the cases under the jurisdiction of the Oswald Commission. Due process has to be followed, and re-analysis is still underway.

The IOC showed its determination to protect clean athletes from the very beginning of the case, in July 2016, by immediately establishing the Oswald Commission and the Schmid Commission, following the publication of the McLaren report. The IOC took this extra measure as Prof. McLaren did not have the authority to bring forward Anti-Doping Rule Violation (ADRV) cases against individual athletes.

The Oswald Commission has announced that all hearings for active athletes who could qualify for the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 will be completed shortly. In accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code, confidentiality has to be respected in the interests of the athletes concerned. The purpose of this work is to ensure that the International Federations (IFs) have the necessary tools to protect the qualification competitions. The outcome of the hearings will be announced as soon as possible after each individual hearing. This will allow the IFs to follow up with their own disciplinary hearings immediately, and to take the athletes concerned out of the qualification system as soon as possible.

On 5 December, the IOC Executive Board suspended the Russian NOC and created a path for clean individual athletes to compete in PyeongChang 2018 under the Olympic flag.

Click here for more information about the IOC Disciplinary commissions and the Sochi 2014 forensic and analytic investigations.

International Olympic Committee Press Release

View this press release online

 
 
December 22, 2017

IOC sanctions 11 Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings

Today, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has published 11 new decisions from the Oswald Commission hearings, which are being conducted in the context of the Sochi 2014 forensic and analytic doping investigations.

As a result, the following Russian athletes have been sanctioned:

- Speed skaters Ivan SKOBREV and Artem KUZNETCOV

- Lugers Tatyana IVANOVA and Albert DEMCHENKO, silver medallists in Sochi 2014

- Cross-country skiers Nikita KRYUKOV, Alexander BESSMERTNYKH and Natalia MATVEEVA

- Bobsledders Liudmila UDOBKINA and Maxim BELUGIN

- Ice hockey players Tatiana BURINA and Anna SHCHUKINA

To date, the number of cases opened by the Disciplinary Commission has reached 46 after additional findings from the re-analyses. All 46 of them have been handled, of which three have been filed. As some investigations are still ongoing (notably the forensic analysis of the bottles), it cannot be excluded that there might be new elements that would justify opening further new cases and holding more hearings.

The IOC Disciplinary Commission, composed for these 11 cases of Mr Denis Oswald (Chairman), Mrs Gunilla Lindberg and Mr Patrick Baumann, decided the following:

Maxim BELUGIN, Alexander BESSMERTNYKH, Tatiana BURINA, Albert DEMCHENKO, Tatyana IVANOVA, Nikita KRYUKOV, Artem KUZNETCOV, Natalia MATVEEVA, Anna SHCHUKINA, Ivan SKOBREV, and Liudmila UDOBKINA are found to have committed anti-doping rule violations pursuant to Article 2 of The International Olympic Committee Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, in 2014, and are disqualified from the events in which they participated.

In addition, the 11 athletes are declared ineligible to be accredited in any capacity for all editions of the Games of the Olympiad and the Olympic Winter Games subsequent to the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014.

The reasoning for these decisions will be communicated in due course.

For further details, please consult the following factsheet.

The Disciplinary Commission, chaired by IOC Member Denis Oswald, is responsible for investigating the alleged doping violations by individual Russian athletes. Therefore, all the samples collected from Russian athletes at the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014 that were available to the IOC were re-analysed. This had two goals: to further review the samples for evidence of doping, and separately to determine if the samples themselves or the bottles were manipulated or tampered with.

Due to the nature and complexity of the cases, this thorough, comprehensive and time-consuming process has taken several months and had to involve external forensic experts, who had to develop a legally-defendable methodology for all the cases under the jurisdiction of the Oswald Commission. Due process has to be followed, and re-analysis is still underway.

The IOC showed its determination to protect clean athletes from the very beginning of the case, in July 2016, by immediately establishing the Oswald Commission and the Schmid Commission, following the publication of the McLaren report. The IOC took this extra measure as Prof. McLaren did not have the authority to bring forward Anti-Doping Rule Violation (ADRV) cases against individual athletes.

The Oswald Commission has announced that all hearings for active athletes who could qualify for the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 will be completed shortly. In accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code, confidentiality has to be respected in the interests of the athletes concerned. The purpose of this work is to ensure that the International Federations (IFs) have the necessary tools to protect the qualification competitions. The outcome of the hearings will be announced as soon as possible after each individual hearing. This will allow the IFs to follow up with their own disciplinary hearings immediately, and to take the athletes concerned out of the qualification system as soon as possible.

On 5 December, the IOC Executive Board suspended the Russian NOC and created a path for clean individual athletes to compete in PyeongChang 2018 under the Olympic flag.

Click here for more information about the IOC Disciplinary commissions and the Sochi 2014 forensic and analytic investigations.

IOC sanctions one Russian athlete, and closes one case as part of Oswald Commission findings

IOC sanctions one Russian athlete, and closes one case as part of Oswald Commission findings

19/12/2017, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 25222070
 

International Olympic Committee Press Release

 
 
December 18, 2017

IOC sanctions one Russian athlete, and closes one case as part of Oswald Commission findings

Today, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has published one new decision from the Oswald Commission hearings, which are being conducted in the context of the Sochi 2014 forensic and analytic doping investigations. As a result, the Russian bobsledder Alexey VOEVODA, double gold medallist in Sochi 2014, has been sanctioned. The case opened against a second athlete has been closed without a sanction.

More hearings concerning other athletes will be held over the next few weeks.

To date, the number of cases opened by the Disciplinary Commission has reached 46 after additional findings from the re-analyses. Thirty-five of them have already been handled, of which three have been filed. As some investigations are still ongoing (notably the forensic analysis of the bottles), it cannot be excluded that there might be new elements that would justify opening further new cases.

The IOC Disciplinary Commission, composed for this case of Mr Denis Oswald (Chairman), Mr Juan Antonio Samaranch and Mr Tony Estanguet, decided the following:

  • Alexey VOEVODA is found to have committed anti-doping rule violations pursuant to Article 2 of The International Olympic Committee Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, in 2014, and is disqualified from the events in which he participated.

  • In addition, he is declared ineligible to be accredited in any capacity for all editions of the Games of the Olympiad and the Olympic Winter Games subsequent to the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014.

  • The Russian team is disqualified from the two-man bobsleigh and four-man bobsleigh events, and the International Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation is requested to modify the results of the above-mentioned events accordingly and to consider any further action within its own competence.

The decision on Alexey VOEVODA is available here.

The reasoning for these decisions will be communicated in due course.

In addition to this decision, the IOC Disciplinary Commission has issued a third decision in which it found that the elements in the file and the conclusions of the investigations conducted so far were not sufficient to establish an anti-doping rule violation. Accordingly, the disciplinary proceedings opened against the athlete were terminated and the case filed. In order to protect the rights of the athlete, the identity of the athlete concerned will not be disclosed and the decision will not be published at this point in time.

For further details, please consult the following factsheet.

The Disciplinary Commission, chaired by IOC Member Denis Oswald, is responsible for investigating the alleged doping violations by individual Russian athletes. Therefore, all the samples collected from Russian athletes at the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014 that were available to the IOC were re-analysed. This had two goals: to further review the samples for evidence of doping, and separately to determine if the samples themselves or the bottles were manipulated or tampered with.

Due to the nature and complexity of the cases, this thorough, comprehensive and time-consuming process has taken several months and had to involve external forensic experts, who had to develop a legally-defendable methodology for all the cases under the jurisdiction of the Oswald Commission. Due process has to be followed, and re-analysis is still underway.

The IOC showed its determination to protect clean athletes from the very beginning of the case, in July 2016, by immediately establishing the Oswald Commission and the Schmid Commission, following the publication of the McLaren report. The IOC took this extra measure as Prof. McLaren did not have the authority to bring forward Anti-Doping Rule Violation (ADRV) cases against individual athletes.

The Oswald Commission has announced that all hearings for active athletes who could qualify for the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 will be completed shortly. In accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code, confidentiality has to be respected in the interests of the athletes concerned. The purpose of this work is to ensure that the International Federations (IFs) have the necessary tools to protect the qualification competitions. The outcome of the hearings will be announced as soon as possible after each individual hearing. This will allow the IFs to follow up with their own disciplinary hearings immediately, and to take the athletes concerned out of the qualification system as soon as possible.

On 5 December, the IOC Executive Board suspended the Russian NOC and created a path for clean individual athletes to compete in PyeongChang 2018 under the Olympic flag.

Click here for more information about the IOC Disciplinary commissions and the Sochi 2014 forensic and analytic investigations.

IOC suspends Russian NOC and creates a path for clean individual athletes to compete in PyeongChang 2018 under the Olympic Flag

IOC suspends Russian NOC and creates a path for clean individual athletes to compete in PyeongChang 2018 under the Olympic Flag

06/12/2017, International, Multi Sports, International Olympic Committee, Article # 25079061
 

International Olympic Committee Press Release

 

 
 
December 5, 2017

IOC suspends Russian NOC and creates a path for clean individual athletes to compete in PyeongChang 2018 under the Olympic Flag

The IOC Executive Board today studied and discussed the findings of the Commission led by the former President of Switzerland, Samuel Schmid, addressing the systematic manipulation of the anti-doping system in Russia. This report also addresses in particular the manipulation at the anti-doping laboratory at the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014 which targeted the Olympic Games directly. Over 17 months of extensive work, the Schmid Commission gathered evidence and information and held hearings with all the main actors. Due process, to which every individual and every organisation is entitled, was followed. This opportunity was not available to the IOC prior to the Olympic Games Rio 2016.

The conclusions of the Schmid Report, on both factual and legal aspects, confirmed “the systemic manipulation of the anti-doping rules and system in Russia, through the Disappearing Positive Methodology and during the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014, as well as the various levels of administrative, legal and contractual responsibility, resulting from the failure to respect the respective obligations of the various entities involved”.

As a consequence, the Schmid Commission recommended to the IOC EB:

  • "to take the appropriate measures that should be strong enough to effectively sanction the existence of a systemic manipulation of the anti-doping rules and system in Russia, as well as the legal responsibility of the various entities involved (i.e., including uniform, flag and anthem);

  • while protecting the rights of the individual Russian clean athletes; and

  • to take into consideration the multiple costs incurred by the two IOC DCs, in particular those linked to the investigations, the various expertise and the re-analysis of the samples of the Olympic Games."

After discussing and approving the Schmid Report, the IOC EB took the following decision:

  • To suspend the Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) with immediate effect.

  • To invite individual Russian athletes under strict conditions (see below) to the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018. These invited athletes will participate, be it in individual or team competitions, under the name “Olympic Athlete from Russia (OAR)”. They will compete with a uniform bearing this name and under the Olympic Flag. The Olympic Anthem will be played in any ceremony.

  • Not to accredit any official from the Russian Ministry of Sport for the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018.

  • To exclude the then Minister of Sport, Mr Vitaly Mutko, and his then Deputy Minister, Mr. Yuri Nagornykh, from any participation in all future Olympic Games.

  • To withdraw Mr Dmitry Chernyshenko, the former CEO of the Organising Committee Sochi 2014, from the Coordination Commission Beijing 2022.

  • To suspend ROC President Alexander Zhukov as an IOC Member, given that his membership is linked to his position as ROC President.

  • The IOC reserves the right to take measures against and sanction other individuals implicated in the system.

  • The ROC to reimburse the costs incurred by the IOC on the investigations and to contribute to the establishment of the Independent Testing Authority (ITA) for the total sum of USD 15 million, to build the capacity and integrity of the global anti-doping system.

  • The IOC may partially or fully lift the suspension of the ROC from the commencement of the Closing Ceremony of the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 provided these decisions are fully respected and implemented by the ROC and by the invited athletes and officials.

  • The IOC will issue operational guidelines for the implementation of these decisions.

How the athletes will be chosen:

To invite individual Russian athletes to the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 according to the following guidelines:

  • The invitation list will be determined, at its absolute discretion, by a panel chaired by Valerie Fourneyron, Chair of the ITA. The panel will include members of the Pre-Games Testing Task Force: one appointed by WADA, one by the DFSU and one by the IOC, Dr Richard Budgett.

  • This panel will be guided in its decisions by the following principles:

    The IOC, at its absolute discretion, will ultimately determine the athletes to be invited from the list.

    1. It can only consider athletes who have qualified according to the qualification standards of their respective sport.

    2. Athletes must be considered clean to the satisfaction of this panel:

      • Athletes must not have been disqualified or declared ineligible for any Anti-Doping Rule Violation.

      • Athletes must have undergone all the pre-Games targeted tests recommended by the Pre-Games Testing Task Force.

      • Athletes must have undergone any other testing requirements specified by the panel to ensure a level playing field.

    3. These invited athletes will participate, be it in individual or team competitions, in the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 under the name “Olympic Athlete from Russia (OAR)”. They will compete with a uniform bearing this name and under the Olympic Flag. The Olympic Anthem will be played in any ceremony.

    4. These invited athletes will enjoy the same technical and logistical support as any other Olympic athlete.

    5. The panel, at its absolute discretion, will determine an invitation list for support staff and officials.

    6. This panel will be guided in its decisions by the following principles:

      • No member of the leadership of the Russian Olympic Team at the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014 can be included on the invitation list.

      • No coach or medical doctor whose athlete has been found to have committed an Anti-Doping Rule Violation can be included on the invitation list. All coaches and medical doctors included on the invitation list must sign a declaration to this effect.

      • Any other requirement considered necessary to protect the integrity of the Olympic Games.

    7. The IOC, at its absolute discretion, will ultimately determine the support staff and officials to be invited from the list.

IOC President Thomas Bach said: "This was an unprecedented attack on the integrity of the Olympic Games and sport. The IOC EB, after following due process, has issued proportional sanctions for this systemic manipulation while protecting the clean athletes. This should draw a line under this damaging episode and serve as a catalyst for a more effective anti-doping system led by WADA."

He continued: "As an athlete myself, I feel very sorry for all the clean athletes from all NOCs who are suffering from this manipulation. Working with the IOC Athletes’ Commission, we will now look for opportunities to make up for the moments they have missed on the finish line or on the podium."

Decision of the IOC EB

Report of the Schmid Commission

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